GL1000 plan for restoration

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Resenok

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Hi everyone

My plan to restore the GL1000 (I don't know the year of production but in my opinion it is K3 / Z from 1979, first registration is 1981).
Today
4963dc30ac710f1a0773bb0bbea51bfb.jpg

in the future
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I am currently starting to dismantle the fairings and look for parts to assemble and drive before the season to check what needs repair. Next winter is complete disassembly, sandblasting of the frame and painting, engine glass bead blasting, chrome plating.

I will be photographing the progress and asking for possible help [emoji854].

First doubt, the question of the frame number is GL2 4114462. I found on the internet that GL2 is the designation of European models from Germany or France? Have you come across the GL2 frame designation?
Engine number is GL1E4114545.
I need check the cab number but access is difficult to read but will still be removed for cleaning before syncing.
Frame number
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Engine number
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but it will be beautiful goldwing for some time [emoji106] regards, Pawel
 

Resenok

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first steps taken towards rebuilding
3a186619024cc588e1ef82a2bd52c2ac.jpg

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first US order on Ebay done. Parts for GL1000 in Europe are a tough topic [emoji853]
 

Gc33

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As I am finding out....a LOTTA luck and as much perseverance is needed....Not sure where you are located but Im guessing America somewhere. at leasat you will have more availability to parts and possibly engines.
Very much testing me here in West Australia...
 

Resenok

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Exactly, I live in Poland (Central Europe, not Eastern Europe :)). GL1000 parts are hard to come by but I can always go to a Honda dealer but I don't know if I have enough money to rebuild the bike ;-). I already bought Fork ears for $ 50 but shipping costs $ 40. Now he writes with a man from Ebay about the lamp, turn signals because he has everything but does not ship outside the US :,-).... I urge him, PayPal wages, but we'll see ....
 

Gc33

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[url=https://www.classicgoldwings.com/forum/viewtopic.php?p=221100#p221100:78g7iyru said:
Resenok » 54 minutes ago[/url]":78g7iyru]
Exactly, I live in Poland (Central Europe, not Eastern Europe :)). GL1000 parts are hard to come by but I can always go to a Honda dealer but I don't know if I have enough money to rebuild the bike ;-). I already bought Fork ears for $ 50 but shipping costs $ 40. Now he writes with a man from Ebay about the lamp, turn signals because he has everything but does not ship outside the US :,-).... I urge him, PayPal wages, but we'll see ....
Well mate... I'm feeling your pain. Check a couple of guys in Canada... I found 2 guys that have a bit of gear. Shippi g is what kills us.. Since all this covid BS it's gotten out of control...
 

pidjones

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I think that the frame may be a dealership replacement (crossed-out boxes on either end of the serial number). The engine number is for a '79. You can tell a '79 frame from a '78 because the '79 has extra gussets between the horizontal members and the cross-tube for the center stand. '79 mirrors were rectangular and the tail light was a large rectangular unit similar to the '79 CB750F. Also the signal lights were semi-rectangular and the front signal stems were rectangular bars that stuck out from the headlight ears. These were universally cut off to permit mounting fairings. Oddly however, it seems that Honda used a few left-over '78 signals and rear lights on some '79s until the bins were empty.
 

Resenok

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pidjones":39suef7z said:
I think that the frame may be a dealership replacement (crossed-out boxes on either end of the serial number). The engine number is for a '79. You can tell a '79 frame from a '78 because the '79 has extra gussets between the horizontal members and the cross-tube for the center stand. '79 mirrors were rectangular and the tail light was a large rectangular unit similar to the '79 CB750F. Also the signal lights were semi-rectangular and the front signal stems were rectangular bars that stuck out from the headlight ears. These were universally cut off to permit mounting fairings. Oddly however, it seems that Honda used a few left-over '78 signals and rear lights on some '79s until the bins were empty.
Thank you for a lot of valuable information. 1. I will check the frame for additional transverse reinforcements. 2. Direction indicators and forks ears were disassembled so I do not know what they were originally, similar to the mirrors, in addition, the brake fluid container should be rectangular and round. 3.The lamp on the back is rectangular with a pin in the center. I have to remove the carburetor because it requires cleaning and adjustment, so I will check the carburetor number. After 42 years, the motorcycle had fairings and trunks added, and it is not known what it looked like in the original. It certainly looks better for me without fairings, it is lighter and it is worth spending a few hundred dollars on it :)
 

Gc33

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[url=https://www.classicgoldwings.com/forum/viewtopic.php?p=221104#p221104:2n13mfmg said:
Resenok » 10 minutes ago[/url]":2n13mfmg]
pidjones":2n13mfmg said:
I think that the frame may be a dealership replacement (crossed-out boxes on either end of the serial number). The engine number is for a '79. You can tell a '79 frame from a '78 because the '79 has extra gussets between the horizontal members and the cross-tube for the center stand. '79 mirrors were rectangular and the tail light was a large rectangular unit similar to the '79 CB750F. Also the signal lights were semi-rectangular and the front signal stems were rectangular bars that stuck out from the headlight ears. These were universally cut off to permit mounting fairings. Oddly however, it seems that Honda used a few left-over '78 signals and rear lights on some '79s until the bins were empty.
Thank you for a lot of valuable information. 1. I will check the frame for additional transverse reinforcements. 2. Direction indicators and forks ears were disassembled so I do not know what they were originally, similar to the mirrors, in addition, the brake fluid container should be rectangular and round. 3.The lamp on the back is rectangular with a pin in the center. I have to remove the carburetor because it requires cleaning and adjustment, so I will check the carburetor number. After 42 years, the motorcycle had fairings and trunks added, and it is not known what it looked like in the original. It certainly looks better for me without fairings, it is lighter and it is worth spending a few hundred dollars on it :)
If you can get away with only spending a few hundred on it, I take my hat off to ya... Scared to count up the cost for the hours of my enjoyment.... I could maybe have had a brand new wing... But where would the fun be in that.. :BigGrin:
 

Rednaxs60

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[url=https://www.classicgoldwings.com/forum/viewtopic.php?p=221105#p221105:20as2uia said:
Gc33 » Today, 6:14 am[/url]":20as2uia]
If you can get away with only spending a few hundred on it, I take my hat off to ya... Scared to count up the cost for the hours of my enjoyment.... I could maybe have had a brand new wing... But where would the fun be in that.. :BigGrin:

Here in Canada same issues. Most of the parts for my engine rebuild came out of the US or from overseas. Have kept track of what my 1200 has cost me over the past almost 6 years and will tally up the costs for the engine rebuild and new paint job. I could have bought a new Gold Wing.

May take a year or so to restore the 1000 to its former glory, but the satisfaction and bragging rights are priceless. I would recommend a tiered approach to this restoration especially since costs are an issue - fully understood. I'd make a plan to just get the bike roadworthy, do the work/maintenance to achieve this, then ride and enjoy. Once this is done, put together a list/plan for the next work period, collect the parts/pieces necessary to do it, schedule the time and execute your plan. Once this work/maintenance period is completed, on the road and enjoy riding the bike. Repeat this as necessary to achieve the end game, that being a fully restored 1000.

Having the bike in pieces for a long time tends to discourage even the most hardened restorer. You would also be picking up parts/pieces along the way for the work/maintenance periods that would be scheduled further down the road so to speak. This is what I have done and have enjoyed the bike immensely; however, this past year has provided a window of opportunity, and I took on the engine rebuild and new paint job. Had 95% of the parts needed for the engine rebuild already on hand - collecting for 5 years - got the best bang for my dollar, and it lessened the pain of trying to source parts/pieces all at once, and the financial pain that comes with that. Started planning the next major work/maintenance period because I want to paint the frame and the other items I didn't get to this time, and rebuild the FD and such.

I'm doing the same for my 1500 engine rebuild project, buying as I go and once I have what I think will get the job done barring the unexpected, The engine will get done. 1200 will be on the road so I'll still have a daily ride and touring machine to use. Don't have to paint the 1500, already done this last spring as my first C-19 project.

Just a few thoughts on how I'd take on a project such as yours.

Good Luck.
 

Resenok

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Gc33 I agree with you 100%. A few hundred dollars is just to assemble and start, technical inspection, registration at the communication office and in the season check the engine, drive and make a shopping list and work for the next winter time ...
 

Resenok

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Rednaxs60
This is my plan to start, drive, check if the bike is leaking somewhere after all, the bike is 42 years old. Make a shopping list, things to do .... have fun driving and satisfaction with the job :)

Wysłane z mojego SM-T830 przy użyciu Tapatalka
 

Gc33

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[url=https://www.classicgoldwings.com/forum/viewtopic.php?p=221127#p221127:2pl5plj3 said:
pidjones » Today- 6:53[/url]":2pl5plj3]
Brakes. Expensive to rebuild, but very necessary!
And as someone said... DON'T FORGET TO CHANGE YA BELTS!! :BigGrin:
 
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