My 1st. Goldwing... My 3rd. Vintage Rebuild

Help Support ClassicGoldWings:

Joined
Dec 13, 2020
Messages
40
Reaction score
0
Location
East Texas
From the title you can determine I know nothing about Goldwings, but do know my way around a motorcycle. Restored a '74 CB750-K and a '78 CB750-F. Both were more complete when I got them home than the Wing. Both were very desirable bikes when finished (if you ever actually finish a bike restoration). Both were sold for less than I had invested in them, and the new owners love their new bikes. So, I'll create a plan for the Wing and report on the progress or set-backs as I can.

Here's the add that caught my attention:
1975 GL1000 Project,
Replaced water pump, Timing belts, coils, head gaskets. front brakes calibers rebuilt and many other things.
Owner has lost interest so its taking room up in my shop,
I don't have time or interest to continue to restore/store it.
Have been ask to sale it.
Clear Texas title.


1975 GL1000.jpg

As she appeared before loading her in my pickup for the 230 mile trip home.

It rained on the way home and for three days after. Since the bike had NO brakes and things were wet, I let her stay in the back of the truck tell it quit raining and a couple of younger stronger friends could help me unload her. She was still a handful, but now sets on my lift in the garage.

I'll come back after Christmas with my plan and some more pictures.

Happy Holidays, Bud...
 

pidjones

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 4, 2013
Messages
1,400
Reaction score
5
Location
Clinton, TN
Welcome! This should keep you occupied for a while. The early 'wings have a simple ignition with only the "auxiliary lighting circuit" complicating the electrics. Note that is has a permanent magnet alternator, so the voltage regulation is done by dumping excess to ground, as there is no field coil to control. Check the "three yellow wires" connections and renew or replace as needed.
 
Joined
Dec 13, 2020
Messages
40
Reaction score
0
Location
East Texas
I promised some pictures. Let's see if I know how to post them.

If this works my Restoration Plan is to follow.

Later, Bud...

Okay, it worked but in reverse order.
 

Attachments

  • Left Front.JPG
    Left Front.JPG
    54 KB · Views: 120
  • Right Side.JPG
    Right Side.JPG
    60.3 KB · Views: 120
  • Left Side.JPG
    Left Side.JPG
    48.9 KB · Views: 120
  • Carberators.JPG
    Carberators.JPG
    51.2 KB · Views: 120
  • Box of parts.JPG
    Box of parts.JPG
    37.3 KB · Views: 118
Joined
Dec 13, 2020
Messages
40
Reaction score
0
Location
East Texas
...and here's the Plan.

Where's the best place to start recovering a motorcycle that has been setting, un-cared for for 13+ years? Take your pick. Almost anything you do can be considered an improvement. Just giving it a bath seems to work wonders. However, I am approaching my recovery with a bit of spending my time and money wisely. You say, “I should have never bought the thing in the first place if that's a concern.” Sorry, I love motorcycles and a challenge makes the end result mucho mejor (Much Better).

When I got the bike I knew it did not have brakes and some minimal effort had gone into trying to get it to run. Supposedly, it has new belts, head gaskets and water pump.

So, here is the initial plan to protect my original investment ($500) and hopeful end up with a bike I am proud to ride. I'm not going for a show bike, and I may change my plan and directions and time goes on and I discover more what I have to work with.

1. Fix the brakes. It just makes it easier for me to move it around in the garage and have some control when I do. I've already got the front brakes working and will proceed to the rear in time.
2. Find out why the carburetors leak. Got them on the bench and ready to put in some gas and see what happens. If it requires a complete carb rebuild I'm good for it, but would like to resolve known issues as simply as possible.
3. Flush gas tank and check for rust etc. Clean and repair as necessary.
4. Check the condition of the belts, timing, ignition, etc. Check valves and adjust if needed.
5. Leave the carbs off the bike for improved access to wiring. A new battery is coming to the old bike. However, before that I think it smart to ring out the wiring for shorts, breaks, and crappy wiring in general. Repair as needed.
6. Check compression. If it's okay.
7. Install the carburetors.
8. Cross fingers – start it up.

At this point I should know what I've got. A parts bike or a platform for an awesome Bar-Hopper.

Give me your thoughts and suggestion.

Later, Bud...
 

joedrum

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 8, 2009
Messages
19,374
Reaction score
5
Location
chuluota florida
Your plan sounds great ...bike looks rather good and clean I've seen much worse ..id say I'd taking timing belt covers off to check belts and timing marks bring each belt to free spot where cam is not tensioning any valve spring and tension belt to taught with slight deflection not over tight do other side same way ..this gets ithe.motor best timing
.as for carbs use a gravity tank of gas about three ft above carbs most use like a lawn mower tank for gravity tank and see if the floats shut the gas off like thete suppose to
.bench sync carbs all the same

Take plugs out with carbs out check compression also hook plugs on wires after compression test and spin motor checking for spark ...of all these things are happening put carbs on and try to fire it up
 
Joined
Dec 13, 2020
Messages
40
Reaction score
0
Location
East Texas
Joe, thanks for the suggestions. Your timing belt procedure will be a real help. The approach for the carbs is exactly how I plan to go after them.

The more I look at the bike the better it looks, to me. We'll see.

Later, Bud...
 

kerryb

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 19, 2013
Messages
825
Reaction score
36
Location
Buffalo, NY
Welcome from Buffalo (ny). Small world, I'm finishing up an '83 goldwing and up next is a '78 cb750f for a return to the street after a long slumber. You'll get lots of good help here.
 
Joined
Dec 13, 2020
Messages
40
Reaction score
0
Location
East Texas
If I didn't mention it earlier the carburetors that came with the bike (supposedly rebuilt but not installed) are for a 198x GL1100 not a 1975 GL1000. I had them on my workbench and hooked up an IV type gas supply. Added gas and it flowed out of the #1 carb float bowl, and before I could stop the IV gas started running out of all the intake runners. Also, had about 1/2" of gas in the plenum. How did that get there? Crap...

Started with #1 carb, removed float bowl. Seal was installed crooked and was pinched. Okay, I need a new seal, maybe 4 new seals. While I'm there I removed the (pressed-in) Pilot Jet. Totally plugged up. I looked at the parts that had been removed for the rebuild, and the old Pilot Jets were screw-in. What? Obviously didn't come out of these carbs. I'm thinking I not only did not get rebuilt carburetors, but a bunch of parts that really didn't even belong to the bike in the first place. So, I proceeded to clean the Pilot Jet. Got it cleaned with a lot of soaking and a very thin wire and carb spray. At this point I 'assume' all the carbs need total rebuild. Costs of rebuilt kit is $190.00.

I'm thinking I need a change of plan. I like the idea of a single carburetor. Thinking I might be able to do that for around $300. Wondering if I should start with a VW single barrel or a Weber 740? Again, I'm 'assuming' this is a stock 1000 cc engine. Any thoughts from someone that's made the change?

Later, Bud...
 

joedrum

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 8, 2009
Messages
19,374
Reaction score
5
Location
chuluota florida
Ok I've done this ..personally I'd go with the 740 progressive linkage 2 bbl carb ...my bike uses 740 32-34 carb the biggest one in this style carb 32-32 is nice carb too ...first thing in do is check and see if the head have the 75 cams in them be good if it does these cams have no numbers on them and the most aggressive ..personally I made my manifold and don't use stock intake horns ..its no piece of cake doing this ..but if done good and dial in right it will trounce the stock carb set up but few get there I'll post more later if your interested lots of stuff here to read on single carb set up ..this forum was about the best in this area ..
 
Joined
Dec 13, 2020
Messages
40
Reaction score
0
Location
East Texas
Duster and Joe, Thanks for the info. I've got a pretty good idea what I need to do. I need to change my immediate plan to verifying the condition of the engine (check timing belts, compression, etc.). If things check out okay, I'll go ahead and order the parts for the carb conversion. If things don't check out okay, I got to back up and regroup.

I'll keep ya'll updated.

Later, Bud...
 
Joined
Dec 13, 2020
Messages
40
Reaction score
0
Location
East Texas
I finally got to work on the GL. Here's what I found.
- Timing belt on right side was loose. Had at least 1/4 deflection. So, I snugged it up just a tad.
- The wiring around the battery case was pulled out, starter solenoid was hanging by the wires, and the battery and Positive Cable were both
missing.
- Installed new battery after putting it on charger over night. Replaced the +cable with a new one, checked the solenoid (ordered a new
one just in case). The one hanging on by just one wire looked really bad even though it checked out okay. When all hooked up the starter
would spin the engine. The new battery doesn't seem to hold a charge.
- Numbered the spark plug wires, pulled the plugs, Squirted some oil in the cylinders and ran compression checks.
- WoW!!! compression measured 165 - 175 on all cylinders.

Time to order some parts for a Single Carb Install.

I'm thinking I might have a pretty good base to build on.

Later, Bud...
 
Joined
Dec 13, 2020
Messages
40
Reaction score
0
Location
East Texas
I decided to go with the single barrel 34 PICT-3 carb and a manufactured manifold. Since this is my first conversion I didn't want to spend too much money and keep things as simple as possible for tuning, etc. The parts were a couple days late arriving because of the USPS delays, but got them and the manifold is installed. I'll be fitting the carb this week. I'll take some pictures of the progress as things come together.

Later, Bud...
 
Top