the Hunley, or pidjones needed a project - '78 frame with '75 engine

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pidjones

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I've been recording this in the New Member's forum but I guess it really belongs here. Those interested in previous posts can look for Needed a "project" in the new member's forum. https://www.classicgoldwings.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=6&t=6199

Not such a good night. Compression testing.
#1 - 75
#2 - 129
#3 - 129
#4 - 136
checked #1 valve lash - perfect. Added about a teaspoon of oil to the plug hole and cranked it a few turns, it goes up to 100. PB Blaster and set a few minutes - down to 90. Oil again and up to 110. Oil in the others and they go to 160-170. Check #1 again, 120. Left oil in #1 to set overnight. I really don't want to go into this engine (don't really have the tools or space for it). I'll look into making a pressure rig out of a plug on my lathe as I don't have welding gear.
 

slabghost

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Rings tend to stick when the motors sit for a long time. They usually free up and reseat after a little run time.
 

pidjones

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My biggest worry is that #1 cylinder had an exhaust valve open when the belt area was under water. If his were true,and there is rust pitting in the bottom of the cylinder, it could be bad news.

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zman

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What I did with PB blaster was to add to the spray straw about 8-10 inches of electric wire sheathing, when I stripped the sheathing off the wire it curled then I used a small piece of tubing to couple that to the straw.
When I slipped the curled tubing end into the plug hole I was able to use one hand to turn the straw while the other sprayed the nozzle.
What this did was put the curled end in direct contact with the top of the piston, cylinder walls and generally all over the inside of the combustion chamber. I did this before I ever turned the motor just in case.
Just make it long enough or secure enough it doesn't disappear into the cylinder.
 

pidjones

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News to report, but not much good. First, I took the snap ring off the U-joint in preparation for pulling the motor. Came off without inventing any new vocabulary. But.... see anything wrong here?
DSC06596.JPG

Then, I got the bright idea to use my USB camera to look in the cylinders. What you see below is arranged as
1 3
2 4
4cyl comp.jpg

:crying:
:head bang:
:rant:
So, I don't know if it is worth going any further with this block. Doubt this will hone out, and it sure won't run out (will it?). Hard to tell how deep the rust goes. Should I just mount the tank, carbs, and enough electrics to try to start it before dumping it?

Guess the next thing is to look for another engine. I don't want to spend over a couple hundred, though - so I will have to be VERY patient. I'd like to stick with a '75 - '77 after all the work I put in the carbs.
 

joedrum

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hmmm it looks bad but it always mor crap up above cylinders than below ...if you want to keep cost down like you said id pull the heads and just clean ...no stoning that would destroy it ...I use all kinds of stuff blades knifes scrubies ...and the most important part touch ...kinda like ice skating with a bull dozer and I bet bet it will be good
 

slabghost

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I'd roll the dice and try to use that motor. Hand cleaning the cylinders can go a long way to making it useful for a long time to come. I'd probably use the cheapest head gaskets I could find with coppercoat gasket sealer. At least until you know the motor will be acceptable for long term use.
 

pidjones

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slabghost":1hu3n6pf said:
I'd roll the dice and try to use that motor. Hand cleaning the cylinders can go a long way to making it useful for a long time to come. I'd probably use the cheapest head gaskets I could find with coppercoat gasket sealer. At least until you know the motor will be acceptable for long term use.
Well, the cheapest I can find is Saber Cycle. Is it worth that gamble, or go with a bit better quality and reputation? The valve cover gaskets look fine. I'm thinking that if I take the route of cleaning without splitting the cases (while attempting to remove almost zero metal from the cylinders), the risk of getting grit/debris around the rings is high. I could spin a plastic or aluminum plug with a couple o-rings to push down on top of the piston and protect that area. 70 mm would be about the limit my little lathe will handle, but it should be do-able.

I'll wait for the engine to be out of the frame for this. Maybe even figure a way to set it with 1&3 up to give both easier access and better lighting. Scotchbrite and chemicals would be the way to go at first. Goal to remove any loose material and give a sealing surface for the rings. This may well work for low RPM, but will the rings seal to a changing diameter at higher speeds? My training and experience is in physics and particle accelerator engineering. I stopped studying internal combustion engines when I left high school. Just maintenance items since, no major engine work. Maybe I should search and study some basics on engines soon.

Another question: I drained the oil and put Rotella 15w40 in before compression testing. Now it is drained again. Will the existing oil film serve through hand-cranking (I prefer the kick start over the generator bolt) for barring over for things like positioning for head removal/replacement and putting the piston at the bottom for the cylinder I'm working?

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joedrum

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theres no problem there ....I never use the stator bolt to turn by hand ....timing covers off and crank bolt is my favorite place ....personally ive had great success cleaning rough motors amd ga,bleing on the lower ends being sound and getting good compression ...im doing one now on the thread 1200 twins ...theres pics there ....it was rough and showed scaring but most all of it was in the glaze on top of metal ...the metal will actually cut easier and you have to use touch not to disturb and mess up below the metal ...it would take some time to get clean ....but the cost is nothing ..if it don't look good you can not buy gaskets and move on to finding motor ...but im thinking it might be fine
 

slabghost

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[url=https://www.classicgoldwings.com/forum/viewtopic.php?p=89060#p89060:1dpls08d said:
mcgovern61 » Sun Jul 14, 2013 1:35 pm[/url]":1dpls08d]If you are concerned about metal grit from cleaning, just use a shop vac at the cylinder while cleaning.
Or flush out debris with spray of light oil or kerosene.
 

pidjones

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GOOD NEWS TONIGHT!!
(I hope!) Pulled the head. Only broke one water pipe elbow screw and the bottom 10mm head bolt - the remains came out Ok after more PBBlaster soak. Looked pretty bad at first blush:
DSC06734bb.jpg

DSC06742bb.jpg

Head gasket leak? The gasket looked burned through on its edge near the bad looking area of the cylinder end. Notice that I did NOT pull the cam or fuel pump (or even the tach cable). After getting it off, I feel it could have been pulled without removing the belt pulley or back belt guard plate.
DSC06753bb.jpg

Using a knife was mentioned vice abrasives, so I got out a new single-edge razor blade and commenced to shave the black-looking area, and voila!
DSC06760bb.jpg

After a very light rub with 2000 grit silicon carbide with isopropyl alcohol:
DSC06763bb.jpg
DSC06767bb.jpg
DSC06771bb.jpg

I only worked on the bottom of the cylinder tonight. Tomorrow night I will get better lighting and get the front, back, top, and near the bottom that I had missed. Then on to the #3 cylinder So far, just spraying the cylinder out with carb cleaner seems to be removing all residue from the cleaning. I coated it all with spray Lithium grease after I finished.

I'll have plenty of time to clean everything and check out the head flatness (I have a surface block) while waiting for the head gasket to come in.

>>> Now, about that new head gasket. Sirius, Parts-n-more, or Honda seem to be my choices. If I go with mother Honda, I'll probably use HDL as I really rely on their GL1800riders web site for info on that, and I feel it best to patronize those that support my habits. Is the Sirius or Part-n-more gasket any good?
 
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