The Mayflower: AKA - I bought a non-running '82 GL1100

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saganaga

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Dang, wish I knew to try oven cleaner first.

Since I had some time and I was curious, I started with 320 on the timing belt cover. That took off a lot of the nasty scale (cracked clear coat?) and some of the black goop (gasket maker material? - but where from?) Still working on getting it all cleaned up - then I'll have to move on to the 400, the 600, etc.

Right now it looks like:

IMG_20191016_235030163.jpg

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I'll try some oven cleaner and see if it takes off the rest of the black stuff. I've tried denatured alcohol, mineral spirits, paint thinner and MEK so far. Whatever this is, it doesn't come off easily.
 

pidjones

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There's also a secret ingrediant. That grease that comes from the elbow.
294cff41d2558dcfd49c534e6bfb36a0.jpg
 

saganaga

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This is the result of 320 - 400 - 600 - Mother's Mag Polish. It leaves a slightly brushed look, instead of a polished mirror-like finish.

Haven't taken the dremel to it yet and cleaned up the nooks and crannies. That's an outside job.

IMG_20191018_230930857.jpg


Passable. Not sure if I want to do more or not. I'll have to wait until daytime and check it under sunlight.
 

saganaga

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Ran into some questions.

1. Got the timing belt covers polished to the level I want for now.

Any decent rattlecan clearcoat that won't yellow with engine heat.

2. Should I reuse the timing belt cover gaskets? They seem fine, but they are decades old.
 

pidjones

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On Amazon you can get 2K clearcoat by SprayMax. Goes on nice, gets awful milky looking, then cures out beautifully in 24 hours. It is an actual two-part that has an internal catalyst container. The gaskets are primarily dust seals, so can be reused. I tack mine on with a soluable sealant like Indian Head.

That said, no clearcoats last real well there - too much damage by pebbles, etc. A lacquer is easily removed with acetone. Or wax it well and count on repolishing about once a year or two, which is much easier without removing a clearcoat.
 

saganaga

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Just to be clear, the SprayMax is not a lacquer, correct?

This is kind of leaving more questions then answers about the best way to handle this.

If the timing belt covers weren't awkward to remove, it would be easier.

Never heard of Indian Head, I'll have to check it out.
 

pidjones

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SprayMax is true 2K (acrylic?) And tough as can be.
Belt covers come off easy with a rachet-head 10 mm. You can make it even easier removing the radiator mount bolts and screws and wedging it forward ~1/2".
Indian Head is an OLD gasket shelac available at most parts stores. I learned about it from an old mechanic. Many others work, just avoid RTV/silicone. It's just to hold the gasket on the cover while you position it.
 

saganaga

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Any reason to use shellac instead of rubber cement?

I could always use some more rubber cement. Not sure if I have a can of shellac around.
 

desertrefugee

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I have done a lot of aluminum polishing over the years. I agree about the elbow grease ingredient. However, of all the polishing that I've done, I have never covered it with clear lacquer or anything else. I prefer to leave the raw aluminum and maintain it. Maintenance is easy if you stay on top of it.

Besides, it's therapeutic.
 

saganaga

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Small issue - some of the black around the "GL1100" broke off while washing the second valve cover.

Best way to handle it? My first guess is to grab some black paint and a tiny brush.
 

pidjones

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The shelac comes off easily with solvent. I guess you could use another soluable cement, but many cure out pretty brittle. The Indian Head seems to stsy a little pliable. Getting rubber cement off is much harder.

I agree with bare aluminum (except wheels - just too much to keep up with). My Hunley is starting to need re-polish, but it has been two years. Waxing does help.
 

saganaga

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Since it is spring, I'm resurrecting this thread. Still have to paint the valve covers again - did some research and "stove paint" seems to be recommended. Waiting for a day in the upper 50s.

I think I'll reuse the valve cover gaskets for now. If they leak, I'll order some OEM gaskets from the local Honda dealer if they are reasonable.
 

pidjones

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If you want to paint the valve covers, most any automotive paint should do. They don't get very hot. Use barbeque paint on the headers/mufflers.
 

saganaga

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I'm keeping the original scheme - some of the paint around the lettering flaked off when polishing.
 

saganaga

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For those keeping track, the battery that came with the Mayflower did not survive the winter - not even on a battery tender.

Going to try to purchase an AGM tonight.
 
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