GL1200 Engine Rebuild - Part 4 - Getting to the Road

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Rednaxs60

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Requiem to an ’85 Limited Edition Engine Rebuild and Paint Project

Been a long 8/9 months to do an engine rebuild and complete paint job. Coated many parts/pieces with CERAKOTE MC-5100 to protect the finish and hopefully, be better to clean. The use of a third party for machining and media blasting, and the cost for these services were weighed against tool availability, expertise, setup, and cleanup. While these services were being used, I was able to progress other aspects of this project.

The engine rebuild included using the original parts and some new.

Work done to the engine

Cylinder checks and honing – machine shop
Con rods checked for straight – machine shop
New aftermarket rings
New crank journal and con rod bearings
New primary drive chain
New primary gear rubber dampers
New alternator shaft support bearing
New engine output (final drive) shaft support bearing
New water pump

Engine cases and ancillary components vapour blasted
Engine cases and ancillary components coated with CERAKOTE MC-5100 to protect the finish and aid in cleaning

Engine heads vapour blasted and coated with the CERAKOTE MC-5100

Timing covers, valve covers, IAC valve cover, and sensor cover over Gr/Gl sensors cover sanded using 400 to 3000 grit wet/dry paper then coated with CERAKOTE MC-5100.

Painting of ’85 Limited Edition

This main body panels were a two-part paint system, brown/gold metal flake with pinstripes then clear coat. The brown trim/accent pieces were a one-part brown colour to match the brown metal flake. Most of the frame parts/pieces were a one-part gloss black paint. Media blasting, grit or water/soda was farmed out to a third party.

Parts painted:

All body panels including the back sides of these panels in a trim black
All brown trim pieces
Swing arm – media blasted, painted then coated with the CERAKOTE MC-5100
Centre stand – media blasted, painted then coated with the CERAKOTE MC-5100
Brake calipers - media blasted, painted then coated with the CERAKOTE MC-5100
Brake caliper securing parts - media blasted, painted then coated with the CERAKOTE MC-5100
Battery box – media blasted, painted then coated with the CERAKOTE MC-5100
Final drive – cleaned, painted then coated with the CERAKOTE MC-5100
Engine heat shields
Engine rear upper motor mounts
Side stand – media blasted, painted then coated with the CERAKOTE MC-5100
Left and right handle bar switch housings – 2 coats epoxy primer then painted a trim black
Radio, CB, and air leveling system switch housings (located on the left handlebar) – 2 coats epoxy primer then painted a trim black
Front/rear wheel rims - painted then coated with the CERAKOTE MC-5100
Trailer hitch - media blasted, painted then coated with the CERAKOTE MC-5100

Additional Items installed:

New speed sensor from a 2002 VT750 Honda
New speed sensor gearbox
New Honda Goldwing emblems – 8 out of the 11
LED bulbs all round
LED dash light bulbs

Another aspect of this project is the time and resources need to accomplish the aim. Never kept track of my time, but can mention that it was considerable. The research necessary to source parts/pieces forms part of this issue.

There were many times I felt overwhelmed, and questioned my decision to undertake such a project. This is quite normal I would think, and needs to be realized before entering into such a project. I also wanted to get this project done so I could ride the bike. This project was not one of those I have another bike to ride and when it gets done so be it. Sonya mentioned today that it was nice to be on the 1200 again. She likes the 1200 and 1500, but each for different reasons. Going to pare down the bike stable - V-Strom will be put on the block this spring, Gold Wings stay.

This is a project where the journey is not the important issue, it's the end result and the bragging rights you get from having done all this work. I have started a new list for the next major work/maintenance period to complete what I missed on this project. Going to keep updating the final work issues and how I overcame some of these. Probably missed listing everything, but have the majority mentioned.

Cheers
 

julimike54

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[url=https://classicgoldwings.com/forum/viewtopic.php?p=221212#p221212:1db1fv74 said:
Rednaxs60 » Yesterday, 10:01 am[/url]":1db1fv74]
The VT750 P/N is 37700-MBA-611, the P/N for the '85 Limited Edition and Aspencade, both have an LED dash, is 37700-MG9-951. Will/should work on any 1200 that has the 37700-MG9-951 P/N. I had found this reference years ago and put it in my parts spreadsheet. The connector on the VT750 speed sensor to hook into the wiring harness is a female connector and it has to fit into a female connector. I made a short wire connector with two male ends to suit.

Thanks for the info!
 

Rednaxs60

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Mike - most welcome.

Have been thinking about what I have done to this bike over the past 5 1/2 years, and what I intend to do as I go forward. The need/want syndrome has always been an issue, but being a pragmatic sort, I used these two words interchangeably.

The bike had in the first two years:

New brake rotors
Rebuilt brake calipers - front/rear
Rebuild front brake MC and clutch MC
Rebuilt clutch slave
New steering stem bearings
New front/rear wheel bearings
New swing arm bearings
New prop shaft
New brake and clutch hydraulic lines - teflon tube/SS sleeve commonly known as SS brake lines
New timing belt tensioner springs
Timing belt tensioner mod
New prop shaft springs
New FD pinion shaft bearing - want to rebuild FD next time round
Clutch rebuild - new steel, friction and damper plates
Replaced starter clutch parts
External alternator mod - stator removed from engine
Side stand safety switch installed
Suspension upgrade - Race Tech front fork springs 1.0 Kg and emulators/Progressive series 412 non-air shocks in rear - included fork rebuild
New leather upholstery all round - seat, passenger back rest, passenger arm rests, trunk side pocket tops - seat modified to suit rider and passenger ergonomics
Accessory fuse block installed for additional items
Starter cleaned and rebuilt (new brushes)
New Ns (crank) sensor - replaced the 1500 mod with a sensor harness from an '86 Aspencade - better fit and allows for redundancy if one sensor fails
Installed new to me Gr/Gl sensor - unit on end of right cylinder head - replaced because one magnet was cracked and 1/2 missing
Installed new to me Pb sensors - replaced OEM Pb (MAP) sensors with a set of late model Suzuki MAP sensors - better technology

There aren't too many items that I have not touched or looked into on this bike. The ECU is the only wild card at this time and I do believe there is an alternative. This is a little project I'm working on. The auto industry has used the Megasquirt successfully, but development has been non-existent for a few years. I have settled on the Speeduino project for my foray into this aspect.

The cost to bring an older bike back to its former glory, or to have a daily road rider is not inexpensive, but I think it's worthwhile. I have done this work on a budget - I'm a pensioner, and over a few years. The intricacies of the early FI models is a bit daunting, but no more so than the carb models - when carbs don't work correctly it can be a nightmare. The cost of a good cruiser/sport touring bike today is not inexpensive.

I knew from the get go that I was going to keep this bike for the long haul and as such, already had a plan in my thoughts as to how I would do this. Short work/maintenance periods to upgrade the bike to a standard closer to that when it rolled out of the factory. Major issues such as an engine rebuild and complete paint job were in the plan, but not for a while - the "while" was helped along by the C-19 issue. To keep the financial pain at bay, decided what parts would be needed and purchased these over a period of time. Only bought the tools required, rather purchase a specific tool then purchase a tool set and have 90% of what I bought collect dust. Found the manuals for this bike, and did a lot of reading and research.

The future plans for this bike are now being formulated in my mind. There will be another major work/maintenance period in say two years. Most of it is cosmetic, but some mechanical as well. The '85 Limited Edition carcass that I just bought, has an ownership, can help with the next work/maintenance period. Have the frame painted ready to go along with some other parts, then swap everything over.

My tentative list is:

Future 1200 Work Period

Painting:

Cowl stay
Right side internal engine guard
Triple tree
Cover under speed cancellation unit
Frame
Centre rear fender (under seat)
Rear brake MC
Air chamber
Foot pegs

Work/Maintenance:

Replace rear shocks
Renew front fork suspension

Starting to see issues with the 2018 and newer GWs. Out of warranty and don't want to take back to the dealer - expensive. Lots to be said for the simplicity of these older GWs.

A key reason for doing all this work is I have a thing about what I own. It will work, and work well. Another key issue is that when Sonya gets on the bike and we go for a ride, or are going to tour, the bike works and I can have a pleasant ride.

Enough of my philosophy, have some issue to resolve, need to find real estate on the bike for load resistors. Small issue with the travel computer, when the system is changed from Kms to Miles, the dash changes, but the fuel management system does not but is supposed to. A mystery to be solved.

Thanks for reading/following.

Cheers
 

Rednaxs60

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Had a good day. Bike out for a ride, have some 250 Kms on the engine now. Almost time for an oil change. While I was out, and listening very intently to the engine, heard a ticking sound. It was ever so slight, but noticeable, and speed dependent - not in sound but in speed. It would sometimes go away. Everything else is normal. Thinking this might be related to the hydraulic valve adjusters. I was going to check the lifters for shim adjustment before the rebuild but never got to it. Is on the list now. Have sourced new lifters if required.

Took the bike down to show it to my paint guy. He was suitably impressed. While I was there, I showed him the final drive that had been painted and coated with the CERAKOTE MC-5100 product. The road was wet on the way in and the FD was a bit dirty. Showed him how the road crap wiped off very easily. Will give the parts coated with the CERAKOTE product a good cleaning in a few days to get a first impression.

The last four new emblems came in today and are on the bike. These were the "HONDA" emblem on the front fairing, and the "EAGLE" on the side covers. Bike is coming together. Only have the Limited Edition emblems for the saddlebags to keep an eye out for, but will refurbish the original ones. Only have the gold and black colours to contend with. The red in the other emblems is too hard to duplicate, glad I was able to find those.

Have read the thread by Canuckxxxx (Brian) '84 1200 for a '82 GW again. Always find something I glossed over. Interesting that Brian made the comment that he would not mention using Tracker piston rings, or doing a single carb conversion on the NGW forum. Piston rings have been modified to fit in car engines for eons. As long as the rings fit the grooves well, no worries. Went on Rock Auto and looked at the ring set that Brian used, $34.00 CDN - good price. The ring grinder that was referenced is approximately $99.00 on Amazon.

Brian also mentioned that it took approximately 3000 Kms to seat the rings, guess I have some riding to do. Brian used a semi-synthetic oil in his rebuilt engine. Using a mineral based motorcycle oil, least expensive I can find, and will change over to synthetic after some 10K Kms.
 

Rednaxs60

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Had another good day today. Over 320 Kms (200 miles), time for first oil change. Going to look into some of the other issues that I have identified as well.

Thinking about the soft ticking sound I am hearing. Think one or more hydraulic lifters have a bit of crud from the engine oil because of the rebuild. Have decided to source and buy a set of new lifters, but until these are here, will change oil and keep listening to the engine regarding this ticking sound. Will also do a shim test when new lifters are here.

Going to take the dash out and apart to have a look at the odometer, do a better fit of the lower fairings, and look at the wiring near and around the front of the shelter to try and get a better shelter fitment.

Have ordered and should receive tomorrow or Friday, a set of hand warmers for the bike. Went inexpensive, $29.00 CDN. Looked at the Oxford type, but way more expensive. Only need for a few months of the year, maybe.
 

mcgovern61

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The approach of buying parts/tools over time does make the cost more palatable to accomplish this level of work. Same approach I took to get the Slug to be a daily rider. Over my 13 years riding her, I transformed the configuration little by little while she was in use which gave me plenty of riding time yet time to fix or replace along the way without going broke.

That first year was the hardest. Barn find condition with a blown engine. It does take patience to reach the point you have with quite a bit of tedious work involved. Congrats!
 

julimike54

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Ernest have you checked the exhaust for a small leak? Mine will make a soft tick noise sometimes and it seems to be the header to muffler connection, need to look into it more....just a thought
 

Rednaxs60

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Will check the exhaust.

Thinking that I'll rebuild the '85 1200 engine that comes with the '85 Limited Edition carcass. I'll be looking for some additional specialty tools that I wanted but didn't get such as the ring compressor.

Update - oil/filter change, connected the driving lights to the handlebar switch. Was going to replace the crush washer on the fuel pump - special from HONDA, has tabs on the inside of the washer to locate it properly, but convinced myself that the system is tight so don't play with it.

Installing an inexpensive set of heated hand grips - $29.00 CDN delivered. Connected these to a spare battery and these do get a bit warm. Should be good for the climate here. The Oxford grips are north of $125.00 CDN, so will make do with these offshore grips. Will be connecting theses to an electrical circuit tomorrow.

Next issue will be to take the dash apart, and determine why the odometer does not work.

Pulled the pin on the Hagon shocks with the RAP system. Like the RAP adjuster, can see the adjustment without getting at the shock:
Hagon RAP Adjuster.jpg
Discussed the spring rate with the fellow at British Cycle in Nova Scotia. Asked for a spring rate that is one spring rate stiffer. Could use the one recommended by Hagon; however, knowing the weight of these bikes and how the progressive shock has faired, solo and two up, think it's prudent to go to the stiffer spring. Could always change after the fact, but that gets into tools and such, not something I want to do.

Update - Suspension - will be looking at renewing the front fork springs, probably at the same time as I install the new rear shocks. The front fork springs that I have from Race Tech are progressive spring rate of 1.0 kg/mm. Thinking the Sonic straight rate fork spring of 1.1/1.2 kg/mm will be better. Have stopped quickly in the past few days and find the front end to travel the full distance of spring travel. This is good as long as I don't bottom out, and This was done while riding solo. Two up riding puts additional force on the front spring when having to haul up short. I'm also thinking I will still get a smooth ride even with the increased spring rate. These springs coupled with the Race Tech emulator valves should be a good fit.
 

Rednaxs60

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Got at a few small issues today. Hooked up the hand warmers, work pretty good for the price. USB in right side of the front fairing connected into the system, battery tender circuit connected, and took the dash out to look at the odometer. The gears all mesh now, but road test confirmed motor may be dead. Looking for another one. The Aspencade uses the same odometer. Not the speed sensor because self-cancelling lights and cruise work and the dash has a speed indication.

Getting better at removing items for work. A couple of years ago I would have looked at removing the dash and maybe spend a weekend if not more time to do the work. Had the bike stripped this morning, did the extra work as well and did a road test all before 5:00 PM.

Took a video of the engine sound, getting louder as I ride it. Took a screwdriver to the engine block and heads, nothing seems to be amiss. Will take the headers off and check put some additional exhaust wrap on where the header and exhaust join. At the same time will check the lifter shim adjustment.

Here's the latest engine video for engine sound:


One of the issues I've had over the years is I struggled to put the shelter on once removed - had to force it. I made the decision that I was going to correct this. Have been rerouting wires, cables and such, and now have the shelter almost a slip into place and bolts in. Achieved the 97% solution today. Will continue my quest to have this a non-issue.

Update - have been thinking about the engine sound. Using the screwdriver as a stethoscope, I didn't hear anything out of the ordinary inside the engine, or at the heads. A Few years back I had the exhaust header nipples replaced and these are a smaller diameter than OEM stock. I used some exhaust tape to make these be a good fit to the exhaust muffler - the header to muffler interface is quite lax at the moment. The aftermarket exhaust header gaskets at the exhaust ports are not the nice donut style from Honda. Having mentioned this, and I need/want to do a better fit of the lower front fairings, Think I'll start tomorrow, remove the exhaust headers, new exhaust tape, new exhaust gaskets, fit the lower front fairings, and see what transpires. Not going to do the lifters shim adjustment check - couldn't hear these when I did the screwdriver test. Getting good at taking this bike apart, shouldn't need more than a forenoon. :hihihi: :hihihi:
 

Rednaxs60

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Got the exhaust headers off and wrapped the exhaust nipple between the header and muffler, new OEM exhaust header gaskets. Will need a road test to confirm results. Making new lower front fairing brackets to suit the external alt mod and the slight adjustments I made over this work period such as the 1800 rad fan install. Will have these done today, road test maybe later this afternoon.

Now that I'm working on the finer details, have time to think about what I've done, is there a better way IMO, and what resources would have been utilized.

One item I would do differently is what electrical wire to use. Most of the additional wiring can be done with 18 gauge wire, but 16 gauge wire is needed as well. I would have taken more time to do a better wiring harness - combining circuits and such, but the time to do a comprehensive wiring build is very time consuming. The other item regarding wiring is the colour code of the wiring used. There are the standard solid colours such as red/black/green/blue/brown/yellow/white and some others, but I have found several companies that supply non-solid colours. This gives you the opportunity to not double up on the same colour time and time again, reducing duplication and the possibility of getting wires crossed so to speak. I also chose one colour for all new grounds - yellow. When I see a yellow wire that I installed, it is a ground.

I have been thinking about the number of circuits I have installed, probably could have combined a few, but did not. Have installed a larger accessory fuse block - combined power and ground bus, but still need a relay to provide power to the fuse block. This has been a topic of discussion on the Stromtrooper forum. There are many options that range from inexpensive, say $20.00 USD to north of $400.00 USD. Some ship to Canada, some do not.

Each has benefits, and each application depends on your needs and the amount of real estate that you have available for installation. Real estate availability on the GW is at a premium and as such, you must determine what your needs are.

There are the inexpensive combined power/ground bus units on Amazon/eBay. Many use the Blue Sea product. Eastern Beaver PC-8 is a popular combined power/ground bus fuse block - needs a relay as well. Fuzeblock is a good alternative - is a combined power/ground bus unit with an integral relay for switched/unswitched circuits. The Neutrino Motorcycle Black Box, the most expensive of the lot mentioned has many good features. I have used all but the Neutrino Black Box.

For the budget conscious individual there are the combined power/ground bus aftermarket/offshore units that can be bought on Amazon and eBay starting at say $15.00/$20.00 USD. A minimum number of 6 circuits would be my recommendation. You will have to install an automotive relay that will turn the power on/off to the fuse block with the key.

The Blue Sea fuse blocks are good quality, and can be had as a combined power/ground bus unit, or just a power fuse block. Blue Sea has a range of product for all your needs, but can be expensive. Need a lot of space.

The Eastern Beaver PC-8, very popular as I mentioned, is a cost effective higher end unit. It can have switched and unswitched circuits but requires an internal wiring jumper of the unit to do this. It can be had with a relay wiring harness, but if so, the internal wiring jumper cannot be used.

The Fuzeblock, an integrated power/ground bus and relay is quite compact and is a good unit where space is limited. Changing from a switched to an unswitched circuit is done by fuse placement.

The Neutrino unit is a very sophisticated fuse block, programmable with a phone app, and each circuit is individually programmable to suit your needs. Only downside is that it is expensive, and programming is done with the phone app. The phone app does give additional information such as temperature. It can monitor the battery and electrical system voltage. Alarms can be programmed in as well. Good for those who like the latest and greatest technology.

Have been mulling this issue over for a while and thought I mention it for posterity.

That's it for my morning rant. Time to get some work done. Cheers
 

mcgovern61

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Two things, in the video, it does sound like an exhaust leak. Did removing the exhaust header and retaping make a difference?

Second, when I rebuilt the Slugs wire harness, I combined circuits only if they already were combined. With the rewired fuse/relay panel from the '86 SEI, I had ample fuses and relays to choose from. To accomplish combining circuits without losing voltage down the line, I used a buss bar block. The upper buss triggers circuits that also power a new power source that is connected via the lower buss. Clean power to all circuits has made a huge difference in performance!

image.php


Pic of the buss bars before I completed the wiring. (BTW all of the terminal ends of the wires were replaced with heatshrink connectors.)

image.php
 

pidjones

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On my '06 GL1800 I installed the Electrical Connection power block with relay so my battery maintainer pigtail (and any others I want) is connected to the buss with key OFF, heated gear connected with key ON. Don't know if it would fit the LTD/SEi, but it is a quality piece. Contact Lewis there if interested.
 

Rednaxs60

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Have seen and read about the electrical connection power block on other threads. I'm using an inexpensive integrated power/ground 12 fuse fuse block from Amazon. Have the fuse block located in the trunk and can still put 2 modular helmets inside.
 

Rednaxs60

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Working away. Have the bike together, lower front fairings are installed, new rad brackets to secure these are done. Did some looking at the shelter install. Have it at the 99.5% fit, very nice to install. Tightened up the exhaust system - new OEM header exhaust gaskets and wrapped the exhaust header nipple where it joins the muffler, stopped all leaks and can now hear other sounds.

Still hear a ticking, and it is intermittent. Continuing my quest for a complete set of hydraulic lifters.

Going to change out the antennas. Have always had an issue with these loosening even after applying blue Loctite. Available from Wingstuff.

Have a small coolant leak into the heads. Had this issue for the 1 1/2 years after I had the heads refurbished in 2019 - used aftermarket gaskets. Never had an overheating problem, nor any oil in the coolant. Going to order in some OEM gaskets, used the ones I had for the first put together before I had a bit of a shifter issue. Probably another minor, hopefully quick work period end May/early June when the new shocks come in. Monitoring, but not concerned.

Was thinking about the rear shock eye to eye distance. The Progressive shocks that are installed are 14 1/2 inch eye to eye, enough to keep the rear tire in contact with the ground when on the centre stand. This eye to eye distance is what is on the Progressive web site. The new shocks are 13.7 inches eye to eye, much better fit. I have mentioned on occasion that there is a take up of slack in the rear drive train when starting off from a stop. Wondering if the extra 3/4 inch affects this because of alignment. Going to find out. Still have to do a final drive shim test.

Thought about the shocks and how the Progressive shocks have performed. These shocks are very good, have done a good job, and I had these installed in 2015 when I bought the bike. For the past three years I have had these on the stiffest setting for solo and two up riding and the ride has been good, better with two up, but good non the less. Having mentioned this, think the shock springs may be getting a bit soft. This is also one of the reasons I have asked for a stiffer spring on the Hagon shocks.

These older bikes sure so challenge the thought process. Cheers
 

Rednaxs60

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Started garage clean up. Have looked at all the wiring pieces I've been hoarding, and what I removed from the bike during this work period. Tossed quite a bit into the garbage. Took any connectors off for future use.

Ordered a set of OEM head gaskets. As I mentioned, hopefully won't need to do anything with them until this coming fall/winter.

Will be doing a hydraulic lifter shim check when I replace the rear shocks. Intend to order a set of Sonic straight rate spings for the front forks as well, 1.1 or 1.2 kg-mm.

Have ordered Hagon rear shocks with the remote preload adjuster (RAP), going to order Sonic straight rate springs for the front forks, 1.1/1.2 kg-mm.

Reading up on the FD backlash check. Need a different dial indicator to do this. Will be looking for one. Have had the FD pinion out just after I bought the bike and did a DIY nut removal tool. Thinking I'll bite the bullet and actually purchase the correct tool. Time and ease of doing the job will be worth it.

Still get a bit of smoke on initial engine start, was hoping after rebuild it would go away. Might be the inexpensive aftermarket overseas rings. Going to monitor and if does not correct itself, going to install new set of rings in next work period. Going to use the rings that Canuckxxxx used in his 1200/1100 rebuild.

Have to look into the fast idle at initial engine start. Relies on water and air temp to do this. Sensors could be weak, but not bad enough to cause an error code in the ECU. Only items I can think of. I replaced the IAC valve a couple of years ago with new OEM.

Other than the aforementioned, engine idles well and works well under load, solo and two up. getting lots of ego boosting with the new paint job.

Always something with these older bikes, but once all the issues are addressed and put to bed, it's going to be great - already is better.
 

Rednaxs60

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Going to be slow over the next week. Have a personal medical maintenance issue to contend with, the dreaded Colonoscopy - the 5 year gotta be done issue.

Have ordered a magnetic base and lever action dial indicator to check the backlash on the FD - $36.00 CDN. Have the standard straight pin type, was my Father's, but it isn't what is needed. Items like this can always be recycled in that after a few years - SELL.

May get the pinion retainer removal tool as well. Did the PVC pipe DIY thing last time, but it really was a PITA. Lots of time spent, and wasn't that good especially when it came to installing the retainer and applying the correct torque. Could take a socket and modify, but same thing, time and effort. Probably spend more than two hours or so doing the work to modify the socket, have to get the socket as well.

Work for the next week is planned, FD inspection all round.

Have some reading to do on the fast idle issue if I can find the information.
 

Rednaxs60

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Update - FD off and apart. Have measured the ring gear to ring gear stop - 0.40 mm, within spec. Tried the ring gear against the pinion, quite a bit of slack - eyeballed the play and have some 2 to 3 mm movement between the ring gear and pinion teeth. Thinking I'll have to do a spacer change.

Need to check the gear teeth pattern with Prussian Blue to determine what the teeth pattern is. Pick up the bluing tomorrow. Pics of ring gear teeth wear pattern:
FD Teeth Wear Pattern 1.jpg
FD Teeth Wear Pattern 2.jpg


these are the pinion gear teeth profiles. This pic shows the wear on the one side:
Pinion Gear Teeth 2.jpg
This picture is not as good, but I do not think this is the driving side:
Pinion Gear Teeth 1.jpg


Have sourced the shims, CMSNL has them so may be an order into that company, again, for parts. Delivery is quite quick. Ordered the pinion retainer wrench as well - getting too old to wrestle with components.
 

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Cleaned up the inside of the FD today. Got the dial indicator yesterday and tried it out today. Seems the backlash is out of spec - measured at 0.35 mm. Used Prussian blue on the pinion teeth. Seems like the teeth profile is not as it should be either. This going to be a test and trial issue. I'm thinking that a change in the pinion gear spacer will affect the ring gear spacer and vice versa. Need to get the pinion bearing off and measure the spacer. The issue with the pinion gear spacer is that the bearing has to come off, a new spacer installed, bearing back on, then a check of the backlash and tooth profile. Put a new pinion bearing on just after I got the bike because there was significant movement in this bearing, could actually see the movement.

Good news is that between North America and CMSNL, all parts are available.

I cleaned the inside of the FD and when I put it together, the outside was a bit dirty. Took a shop towel and wiped the FD clean without using any cleaning product. The CERAKOTE MC-5100 coating seems to be working well and to expectations.
 

dan filipi

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Location
Van Nuys Ca.
My Bike Models
1983 Interstate
2018 KLR 650
2018 BMW S1000 RR
My Bike Logs forum link
https://classicgoldwings.com/forums/dan-filipi.122/
Ive put a couple differentials together in 4 wd pickups. Definitely a bit tricky getting them set up correctly. Not something I would try to do again laying on the ground under the truck.
 
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