The Mayflower: AKA - I bought a non-running '82 GL1100

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desertrefugee

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A lot of the old Keihlins had overflow tubes. Those on the GLs do not. They are notorious for developing cracks if enough moisture makes its way into the carbs before winter and freezes.
 

mcgovern61

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Quick trick to bleed the brake system on Goldwings:

After cleaning the pistons and calipers, with the calipers off the rotor, push the pistons all the way in and clamp them there. Bleed the system like normal until you get a hard brake handle/pedal but keep the bleeder screw pointing up. It is important to keep that bleed screw pointing up because Honda did not insert the bleed screws at the highest point on the caliper and air always gets trapped.

Next, release the calipers and pump them out with the brake handle slowly until the master is halfway down. Stop and push the pistons all the way back in. This gets rids of air and also ensure your master cylinder return is working correctly.

Once done, fill the master and pump the brakes until they catch the rotors (filling the master as you go. Do not let the master run out of fluid in this process.)
 

saganaga

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Thanks guys for the bleeding tips and the info on Keihin float bowls! Unfortunately bleeding is not going to happen today. :(

Reassembled the front brake system, but while bleeding, I noticed a leak from the base of the master cylinder reservoir. Hmmm. So that's what the crusty deposits were when I separated the reservoir from the master cylinder. I drained the master cylinder for now so I wouldn't leak brake fluid on the fairing.

It could be the o-ring under the master cylinder reservoir. But the reservoir is obviously damaged by age (UV exposure?) and perhaps damaged by removal - the plastic is so cloudy and checked that I couldn't tell if I cracked it, or if there was already a crack. I will have to source a replacement.

Replaced the float needles, seats, and various other items in the carbs today, but I did not set the float level height. That's going to be a job for another day. I've read Randakk's article on how to do that, since I'd rather not have to pull the carbs a third time.
 

saganaga

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[url=https://classicgoldwings.com/forum/viewtopic.php?p=209883#p209883:22u5rt17 said:
pidjones » Today, 8:29 pm[/url]":22u5rt17]
If the resevoir is Ok, you can glue up a new o-ring out of o-ring cord.

Huh, never heard of o-ring cord. Seems like a nifty thing to have around.

I figure the reservoir should be replaced though. If I order it tomorrow, I should get it by this weekend or early next week.
 

pidjones

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I bought some bulk on ebay. Just cut to length on a 45 with a single-egde razor blade and glue with super glue. I've made a bunch of custom lengths and shapes.
 

saganaga

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Made a quick and dirty measurement gauge out of some plastic in the recycling bin and adjusted all the floats to 15.5mm. While staring at the carbs, I think I have a fix for the small air leaks around the chokes - I think a washer or two on where it enters the choke, and a weak spring between them to hold them flat against the carb body would create a seal without having an effect on the carb operation. But I'm not going to be modifying the carburetor right now. No sense in introducing a possible complication when I don't know all of the current issues.

Put the carbs in a tupperware container and hooked them up to a gas source to sit overnight. We'll see if there are any leaks. If they don't leak, I'll try installing them this week.

Ordered the replacement front brake fluid reservoir today. It says it'll come by or on June 1st, which is also the day the motor vehicle insurance policy becomes active. (And the day I'm taking a MSF returning rider's/intermediate rider's course with my wife - she's coming back to riding after a hiatus and I figure more practice is always good - I'll do that on the CM400.) If I'm lucky, I'll be able to do a slow test ride on Sunday and see what issues remain. Probably should pick up some gear oil and do that after a slow test ride.
 

saganaga

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It runs! With the new carb parts, it is a lot less smokey. And the radiator fan kicks in!

Now the wait for the front master cylinder reservoir. I'm not even going to move it off the center stand without having a front brake.
 

saganaga

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I made a checklist of things to do assuming the low speed test ride goes well. I based it off the HSM (Honda service manual) and a few other checklists I've found here and there.

What am I missing? (1982 GL1100 standard.) Oh, and feel free to reuse / adapt as needed.

Code:
☑ Pre-ride inspection (MSF one)
☑ Check all fluid levels
  ☑ Oil
  ☑ Coolant (50/50 premix)
  ☑ Brake (DOT-3)
☑ Inspect fuel lines
  ☑ Check for brittleness, deterioration, damage or leaks.
  ☑ Check tightness of hose clamps
☑ Check petcock operation - on, off, reserve
☑ Replace fuel filter
☑ Check all fuses
☑ Check all electronic switches.  Make sure either brake lever turns on the brake light.
  * Note - one of the lower running light bulbs are burnt out.
☐ Inspect throttle operation
  ☐ Should operate smoothly
  ☐ Should close automatically
  ☐ Cables should be inspected for deterioration, damage or kinking
  ☐ Lubricate cables
  ☐ Throttle freeplay should be 2 - 6 mm (1/8 to 1/4 in)
☐ Inspect choke operation
  ☐ Should operate smoothly
  ☐ When choke lever is extended fully, choke should be fully closed
  ☐ When choke lever is pushed all the way down, choke should be fully open
  ☐ Lubricate cable
  ☐ Choke should stay wherever it is positioned
☐ Empty crankcase breather storage tank
☐ Check spark plugs
  ☐ Gap for 1982- is 0.8 - 0.9mm (0.031 - 0.035 in)
  ☐ All sparkplugs should have washers
  ☐ Tighten by hand, then tighten an additional 1/2 turn
☐ Inspect and adjust valve clearance
  ☐ Inspect when cold
  ☐ Remove timing mark hole cap and generator cover hole cap
  ☐ Alight T1 marks
  ☐ Remove cylinder head covers
  ☐ Align T1 mark by rotating the generator rotor clockwise
  ☐ Make sure rocker arms on no 1 is on compression stroke
  ☐ Check clearances for Cyl #1 (I & E), Cyl #3 E, Cyl #4 I
    * Intake:  0.10mm (0.004 in)
    * Exhaust:  0.13mm (0.005 in)
  ☐ Rotate one full turn.
  ☐ Check clearances for Cyl #2 (I & E), Cyl #3 I Cyl #4 E
  ☐ Reinstall cylinder head covers, timing mark hole cap and generator cover hole cap
☑ Replace engine oil & filter
  * Oil weight is:
    * 10W-40 (~10F+)
    * 10W-30 (~10F - ~90F)
    * 20W-40 (~30F+)
    * 20W-50 (~30F+)
    * (Note 15W-40 is cheap - look for Shell Rotella T4 15W-40, should be JASO MA/MA2 rated on bottle)
    * Approximate 3.4 US quarts are needed* Is 20W-50 better for an old bike?
☑ Replace oil filter
☐ Adjust pilot screws to proper settings
☐ Synchronize carburetors
  * RPM should be 950+/-100 RPM
  * Carbs should be within 50mm (2.0 in) Hg or less
  ☐ Recheck idle speed during procedure and when done
☐ Check carburetor idle speed* 950RPM +/-100 RPM
☑ Check that radiator fan turns on and engine does not overhead
☐ Clean and inspect radiator
  ☐ Clean dead insects and other obstructions from radiator fins by directing low pressure compressed air or water through fins from the back side
  ☐ Check for bent fins.  If more than 20% are bent, the HSM recommends replacement
☐ Check coolant hoses for cracks, deterioration, bulges.  
☐ Check tightness of coolant hose clamps and radiator mounting nuts
☐ Drain radiator fluid, flush & replace (50/50 blend)
☐ Lubricate final drive shaft joint
  * Should be a grease fitting at the final drive gear case flange
  * Use NLGI-2 or equivalent lithium-based multipurpose grease with molybdenum disulfide additive
☐ Replace final drive lubricant
  * Motorcycle should be on center stand
  * Remove drain plug and filler cap
  * Rotate wheels to drain any residual oil
  * Check sealing washer & replace drain plug
  * Fill gear case with recommended oil.  Allow 2-3 minutes for the oil to flow around gear teeth and recheck level
  * Oil recommendation:  Hypoid gear oil API GL-5
    * Over 5*C - SAE 90
    * Below 5*C - SAE 80
  * Approx 4.7 - 5.4 oz
☐ Inspect tires, replace if necessary.  Check wear, age, signs of cracking or damage
☐ Check rims for being out of true, bent rims, and loose rivets.
☑ Inspect battery
  * For lead-acid, check fluid level
  * Should be 12.7+V if fully charged
  * Clean contacts
☐ Check brake hoses for deterioration, cracks, leaks, etc.  Check for loose fittings and leaks.
☐ Replace brake fluid
☐ Check brake pad wear
☐ Adjust rear brake lever height to 7mm above upper surface of the foot peg height (1980-1982)
☐ Check rear brake light switch (should turn on when pedal is depressed and brake engagement begins)
☐ Check that either brake lever stops bike
☐ Check headlight aim
☐ Check clutch free play (10 - 20mm (3/8" to 3/4"), measured from end of lever* Note - do not expose more than 8mm (5/16") of adjuster threads beyond the lever holder
☐ Check clutch cable for damage or kinks, then lubricate
☐ Check side stand for pad exceeding wear lines, and looseness.  
  ☐ Lubricate the pivot.
☐ Check front suspension
  ☐ Lock front brakes, pump suspension up and down.  Should be smooth.
  ☐ Check fork assembly for damage and leaks
  ☐ Check hoses for deterioration and cracks* Tighten all nuts and bolts
  ☐ Put bike on center stand, pressure should be within 14 - 21 psi
☐ Check front bearings - put bike on center stand, jack up front of bike, make sure front wheel turns freely and smoothly from full left to full right.  Make sure there is no free play when pushing or pulling on sliders.
☐ Check rear suspension
  ☐ Put bike on side stand, push and pull the rear wheel from side to side, checking for looseness
  ☐ Check swingarm for damage
  ☐ Check shock absorbers for damage and signs of leakage
  ☐ Inspect air hoses for damage and cracks
  ☐ Make sure pressure is 28 - 57 PSI (1981 - 1982)
  ☐ Warning light should come on when ignition switch is turned on
☐ Compression test - should be between 142 to 171 psi, with a max of 14 psi difference.  According to an online blog, an old bike that hasn't been run may improve compression after being ridden for awhile (1000 miles?)
☐ Check all nuts/bolts/cotter pins/hose clamps/cable stays.
☐ Replace fork oil
☐ Replace shock oil
☐ Check alternator voltage when running
☐ Check regulator (13.8V - 14.4V according to internet)
☐ Check radiator fan kicks in and motorcycle does not overheat
☐ Replace timing belts (may be done already on mine)
☐ Check torque of triple tree clamping bolts
 

saganaga

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90% of that checklist is just all the scheduled maintenance that *should* have been done by the previous owner (but often wasn't). A lot of it can be combined, or is done in the normal course of getting the motorcycle in operating condition.
 

dan filipi

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Good list.

Since I’ve found loose nuts and bolts on used bikes, I’d add to go around the bike and tighten them all.
And since the timing belts are so important, imo checking/replacing them should be at top of the list.
 

saganaga

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Brake reservoir came today. Bled brakes. Result isn't as firm as I like (and I did tip each caliper!), but these are 40 year old lines with dual calipers so almost twice the brake line length. I'll check for leaks tomorrow, but I suspect that steel lines are a needed upgrade.

Insurance kicks in on Saturday, so I'll do a gentle, boring test ride. Still need to contact the previous owner to confirm the timing belts were changed.
 

saganaga

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[url=https://classicgoldwings.com/forum/viewtopic.php?p=209974#p209974:3q8386h4 said:
Ohara » Today, 5:48 am[/url]":3q8386h4]
If you change them now you will know for sure exactly when they were done.

You are right. I'll look up the procedure and order the parts.
 

saganaga

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Took a test ride today in full gear. Only for about a mile loop, about 45 mph tops. Bike runs pretty well for the carbs only being bench balanced. Front brake feels a little mushy to me, but so does the rear (which I haven't touched). Think I'll try to bleed the front one more time and flush the rear with fresh fluid. I've found a recommendation to bleed at the banjo bolts as well, so I'll try that, after covering the bike in some plastic to protect the paint.

Otherwise I didn't have any complaints. I'll finish tuning it up and replacing all the other fluids. And diagnose the front suspension slow air leak issue (I suspect the air valve). Itching to take a longer ride once I go over the brakes again. I did notice that the Vetter fairing is a little creaky - bolts seem tight, and there are no visible cracks, so perhaps this is how they just are?

I did get in touch with the person the previous owner bought the bike from. Very nice guy - grew up about two blocks from where I live now. Timing belts were changed in 2013, and he said he put less than 5,000 miles on it. It sounds like the 50k on the odometer is correct as well. He didn't report any other issues with the motorcycle. I'll order some replacement Gates belts and install them in a month or two, just so I can take a look at that myself.

By the way, in regards to bolts and nuts, I have heard a suggestion to draw a small mark on bolts and the surrounding with a paint marker, just to be able to easily tell if a fastener has shifted. Never tried it myself, but I think it is a useful idea for critical bolts.
 

desertrefugee

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Love your enthusiasm! You're going to enjoy GL ownership. You certainly picked the right mount. With just a little preventative maintenance and attention to key items, these old girls will reward you in spades.

In my humble opinion, marking bolts to monitor movement really shouldn't be necessary. If torqued or tightened using common sense, loosening rarely happens.

Have fun!
 

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